Wynn Resorts Pulls Plug on Paradise Park Lagoon

Wynn Resorts has confirmed a story we were the first to share, that it’s pulled the plug on its Wynn Paradise Park lagoon project.

While Wynn started tearing up grass on its golf course several months ago in preparation for the lagoon, it will now redesign and open the 18-hole course again with the assistance of designer Tom Fazio.

Wynn golf course

Here, you can see the partially torn up Wynn golf course. If only golf courses had an undo function.

The lagoon project was considered a longshot from day one, a vanity project of disgraced former CEO Steve Wynn.

With Wynn out of the picture as a result of his sexual misconduct scandal, there was no champion of the lagoon project at Wynn Resorts, and it simply didn’t pencil out.

The project was supposed to feature not only the 38-acre lagoon (with water skiing, paddle boarding and parasailing), but also bumper cars, a boardwalk, carousel, ziplines, a nightly Carnivale parade (with a dozen 30-foot floats) with fireworks and even an animatronic King Kong.

Yes, that’s a lot of whimsy. Then again, it’s Las Vegas.

Wynn Paradise Park

What might have been.

During an earnings call, Wynn Resorts said that since closing the golf course, the company has lost out on $15-20 million in revenue.

The Wynn golf course closed on Dec. 22, 2017.

Here’s a look at the Wynn golf course before it looked rode hard and put up wet.

Wynn Golf Club

You can’t afford it, so don’t bother drooling.

While Wynn Resorts confirmed the lagoon project would be nixed on Nov. 7, 2018, we shared the story during a Channel 8 segment and on Twitter back in October. Because our tipsters are badass, bro.

The Wynn convention center is expected to proceed as planned, but the hotel tower at the canceled Wynn Paradise Park appears to be shelved.

It’s unclear what, if anything, will happen with the former Alon site, just across the street from Wynn and Encore. Wynn officials have said they expect it to take two years to design and develop a plan.

Don’t be surprised if the current Wynn leadership isn’t around to see whatever it’s going to be come to fruition. The development of the Alon site won’t even start until 2019.

Alon site

It seems the Alon site will remain empty for at least two years. Sigh.

While Wynn Paradise Park seemed overly ambitious and slightly nutty, Las Vegas could use a little more of that at the moment.

It feels like Vegas has traded in audaciousness for prudence, boldness for pragmatism. Prudence and pragmatism might pay some bills, but they don’t exactly scream excitement.

Las Vegas could use less corn hole and more giant King Kong, less sure thing and more Hail Mary.

While Wynn Paradise Park won’t be happening, it felt like something fresh and fearless, and we feel a tinge of sadness at its demise. Big ideas don’t come along every day, and Wynn Paradise Park was just that.

18 thoughts on “Wynn Resorts Pulls Plug on Paradise Park Lagoon

  1. Andy

    Face it,without Steve Wynn Wynn resorts is bounded to become another “ face of a bank” like company,pretty much like MGM. And not only Wynn Resorts,but the whole town. The guy was the very last of the cowboys/prospectors era,ready to bet it all in no matter what the odds. Bennet,Sarno,Wynn,Adelson…a guy like Murren looks like a bank teller if compared to them,because he really is. And I know he hates that. Well,times changes and things happens, not much one can do about it..

    Reply
  2. DR.FUNK

    The golf course was a “safe bet” and a proven money-maker. But the lagoon would’ve rocked.
    I would’ve sectioned off a part of it for a Kelly Slater Wave Park.

    Reply
  3. FYMYAWF

    Agree w/the last part of the piece. The downturn in occupancy and thus profits seem to be killing any “big ideas” on the strip, with the possible exception of the (slowly) proceeding Resorts World.

    It feels like the big players are hunkering down and preparing to sell things off or consolidate or merge, as if they see another 2008 coming. Looks to be a lot of biting of nails in resort boardrooms lately.

    Reply
  4. Allen

    Wynn is/was a visionary who took chances that bean counters run from. The Mirage volcano, Treasure Island pirate show, Bellagio lake and radically different entertainment ie: Cirque, wouldn’t have happened without him.

    Now Paradise Park goes on the scrap heap. It’s a shame because Las Vegas thrives on the Wow factor. No Wow in a new convention center.

    Reply
  5. Rafyy

    Never liked the Paradise Park idea…seems too cheesy to me.

    But its such a shame Wynn got ousted; wouldve loved to see him build one last over-the-top place on the Alon site.

    Reply
    1. KRW

      Getting ousted made him free. Now the billionaire is working on his next project which will eclipse everything has has achieved previously. The proof that is true is his achievements in the past and having an unlimited canvas to draw upon today. His best is yet to come, to think otherwise would be foolish.

      Reply
  6. Funkhouser

    Da Steve was willing to push the envelope since he seemed to understand what most tourists
    to Vegas wanted to experience. His departure will have an impact on future LV design, until a new
    visionary who scores with big with an idea comes along. Sadly I believe it will only happen with smaller
    less risky projects such as a nightclub, restaurant, or duplication of another project from somewhere else in the country. Even Resort World toned back their grand concept which I for one loved. Yes boys and girls innovation is dead in Vegas since no one in the current crop of leadership has the balls to bet big and risk failure.

    Reply
  7. Steve Cooper

    Wag the Dog. Lets not talk about my perverted criminal devious ways. Lets talk about the Lagoon I may build if I can survive the accusations. Ugh! Justice, Money and Power sure look strange from my point of view.

    Reply
  8. Coop

    You do understand the crimes were committed before (you found out) “waay before Wynn’s accusers came forward.” His wife sure knew. Oh ya she is surely invested in a good financial outcome as well. Let’s talk Lagoon in a desert…LOL

    Reply
  9. Robin

    The sad truth is: over the last 20 years, LV has turned into a series of fancy malls over-priced hotels rooms and chain restaurant food courts. Nothing more, nothing less… The magic and uniqueness that once ruled this city is all but a memory. The cost-to-fun ratio is off the scales now, and the only “new” things you see moving in are extensions of existing restaurants that have their origins in other locations. Come on Vegas, get your act together and recapture what made you great all those years ago!

    Reply

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