Smith and Wollensky Steakhouse to Close on Las Vegas Strip

A fixture on the Las Vegas Strip, Smith & Wollensky restaurant, is set to close on May 26, 2017.

The three-floor steakhouse, with its distinctive facade, is located across from Monte Carlo resort.

Smith & Wollensky

Thanks a lot, Smith & Wollensky, for photobombing our picture of these palms trees.

According to the Las Vegas Review-Journal, there are plans in the works for Smith & Wollensky to open in another location, but no specifics been provided by the restaurant.

The Smith & Wollensky steakhouse on the Las Vegas Strip is one of nine locations throughout the U.S. and U.K. The chain was founded in 1977 by partners Alan Stillman and Ben Benson. Stillman is best known for creating T.G.I. Friday’s.

Surprisingly, Smith & Wollensky isn’t named after people. Those names were chosen randomly from a Manhattan phone book. (Note to millennials: Yes, people used to look up phone numbers in books.)

The announcement of the very first Smith & Wollensky restaurant used the names Charlie Smith and Ralph Wollensky, but founder Alan Stillman later confided Charlie and Ralph were the names of his dogs.

Dog

This is neither Charlie nor Ralph. We just like dogs.

Smith & Wollensky opened on the Las Vegas Strip in December 1998. The restaurant chain changed hands in March 2016.

A rep for Smith & Wollensky said it’s anticipated the company will share information about their new location closer to the restaurant’s closing date, but that remains to be seen. Smith & Wollensky is a rare free-standing steakhouse on The Strip (we can’t think of another one that’s not inside a hotel-casino), and we’ve never heard much about it, good or bad.

The reason for the restaurant’s closure is unknown, but a good rule of thumb is financially successful restaurants don’t tend to close in Las Vegas.

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  • RustyHammer

    I know I’ve seen the building plenty of times, and it’s distinctive, yet the place is a blur to me. I know where “across from the Monte Carlo” is, and yet this joint ain’t as distinct in my memory as the former Harley Davidson burger joint. It doesn’t help that I don’t spend much time on the strip any more. And paid parking won’t get me back to the strip any sooner. And yes, we realize that a bust may be taken from downtown to access the precious strip.

    The real reason Chuck and Buster’s steak house is leaving the strip? They don’t serve casserole.

    LONG LIVE GIORDANO’S, BABY!

  • Bouldersteve

    Although I have driven or walked past countless times never really noticed it for some reason. Maybe its the signage or lack of it.From the photo it does not look like a restaurant. More like a furniture store or art gallery.

  • overloadinco

    I’d consider the Golden Steer as being on the Strip, but your point that the Strip is dominated by Hotel-Casinos is valid.

  • Photoncounter

    Was a nice place. Ate there years ago, really lightened my wallet but the steak and service were great. Too many other high end places to compete with and now that the casserole virus has infected Las Vegas I bet more will close soon as well.

  • Brad Engnath

    How could you forget about Outback in the Coke Bottle? Haha….I think technically they’re a steakhouse.

  • mattjs33

    I’ve gone to Vegas once a year for ten years straight, and have walked by there countless times and never even knew it was a restaurant. In fact, I don’t recall seeing their name in any of the guides I’ve thumbed through over the years. So my guess is they had a publicity problem. Plus that area never exactly screamed “gourmet steak house” to me, in between the helicopter tour kiosks and Coke World.

  • Knight702

    Finally I know what this building was about! Passed in front dozen of times without really noticed it…

    Mystery solved, thank you!