Resort Fees Jacked Up at Caesars Entertainment’s Four Mid-Strip Casinos

Somebody didn’t get the memo.

Despite a non-stop cavalcade of Las Vegas visitors griping about resort fees, and rightly so, Caesars Entertainment is bumping up resort fees at four mid-Strip casinos: Harrah’s, Flamingo, Linq and Bally’s.

resort fees

For shame, already.

The resort fees at these casinos will go up to $41.95 a night. That’s $37 a night (currently $35), plus tax. Yes, you’re taxed on resort fees, to make them extra fun.

The resort fee increase goes into effect on March 3, 2020.

Resort fees don’t apply to Diamond or Seven Stars loyalty club members, as that “perk” is included in their tier benefits.

No resort fees rally

That time Caesars Entertainment used “no resort fees” as a marketing tool. It seemed like a good idea a the time.

So, about that memo.

See, visitation to Las Vegas has been flat for two years now. This has been caused by a number of factors, including the legalization of gambling across the country.

What casinos don’t seem to get, though, is people are also not visiting because they’re angry. They’re frustrated by parking fees, CNF charges, venue fees and $20 minibar bottles of Fiji water (looking at you, Aria).

Accurate or not, to many, the perception of Las Vegas has shifted from a value destination to a nickel-and-diming destination.

Where there have been glimmers of hope, including Wynn and Encore eliminating paid parking, most casinos don’t seem to realize their short-term decisions will hurt Las Vegas in the long run.

It’s time to make Vegas a value again. It’s also time for us to share this, again.

make Vegas a value

We made this. It should be a thing.

There are still a lot of great values in Vegas, you just have to know where to look. Our totally unbiased recommendation is read more Las Vegas blogs.

 

64 thoughts on “Resort Fees Jacked Up at Caesars Entertainment’s Four Mid-Strip Casinos

  1. Ed

    I remember that I paid 19usd plus tax for a room in Bally’s some 15 years ago. Resort fees were non existent.

    My favorite off strip hotels raised their prices (including resort fees) in the last 3 years from the low 50s to 120ish. This is the second year I choosed not to visit Vegas and I think many tourists do the same.

    Reply
    1. Robert

      We just returned from Las Vegas February 12th.
      I probably won’t be returning to the city and I use to brag to people how much I loved going there.? The resort fee is not the only thing wrong now. First of all it doesn’t seem like you get anything for it , with the suana and whirlpool costing an extra $25.00 a day per person. We didn’t receive any buy one get one coupons like they use to give you. No feee meals when we gambled with our players card. Nothing at all. Drinks are overpriced, food is overpriced. Just was night a good place anymore. My hard earned money can be spent where my presence is appropriated.

      Reply
      1. Zman

        Agreed. I can play the same games in a 100 other places closer to me. There is no value in rooms food or drink anymore

        Reply
    2. Kent

      I don’t like resort fees at all , never did. But where you going to go that’s around two hours flight with these awsome swimming pools , I mean really ,Hawaii 6 hour long flight both ways and they also have resort fees. If you use the money you make in the stock market for your vacations it does not seem like your really spending your money, If your not in the market well cut back on your hometown dinning , eating out in Vegas can have a nice relaxing experience , especially by the pool, Wynn pool Is awsome. I’m sure this new corona virus will hurt the hotels this spring break and maybe we get a break on the resort fees to $0 fees . Are ya listening Wynn

      Reply
  2. alex

    While the visitation stat is important, it’s not as important as the company financials. Fourth quarter results were just announced. In 2019, Ceasars’ revenue rose 4.2% over 2018. That means that despite lack of new customers, the company still made more money than the previous year.

    (Caesars has major debt issues. So despite making more money, they still ended up with a net loss of over $1 billion versus a profit about $300 million in 2018.)

    As for the resort fee, I’m certain they have reams of data that says that the number of people who will cancel/not come over a $2/day increase is small compared to the overall revenue increase.

    Note: I’m not saying I agree with or like these increases. I’m merely stating some reasons why they happen.

    Reply
    1. Lynn

      We usually stay in a condo without resort fees. Make meals, grill out, mix drinks a hella lot cheaper than casino resorts. We have meals out as a special treat. The money savings is huge and the sunshine is still free. Also, we play the free apps for rewards like free meals and shows. This strategy allows us to have a well-priced vacation.

      Reply
  3. Doug

    @Alex indeed. People have been predicting that resort fees would cause so many people to stay away, the hotels would have no business. If that were happening, the fees wouldn’t keep going up. We will see them fall (or more likely see promos that waive them) in the next recession.

    Fun fact: anyone under 33 probably can’t remember a time when resort fees didn’t exist in Las Vegas. And that’s a lot of visitors.

    Reply
    1. alex

      Good point, Doug.

      And it’s not just Las Vegas. Most people under 30 probably can’t remember a time when resort fees didn’t exist in any leisure destination. They exist everywhere from the Caribbean, to Florida, to California, and to Hawaii and beyond.

      Reply
  4. Kelly Fulton

    As of two years ago when I retired from Caesars Palace, Seven Star guests rarely paid resort fees, but I’m not sure I’d say “never.” Diamond guests frequently got hit for the resort fee depending on the offer they were on. Any nights that weren’t comped, the guests paid the resort fees. And when hosts were assessing their “costs” when deciding how much additional comps to give a Diamond guest, the resort fees were added in with the comps “already extended,” which might cost them additional comps in food, etc.

    Reply
  5. Patty

    My husband and I used to come to Las Vegas 2-3 times a year from Michigan. With all the hikes and rule changing, it’s just too expensive. We’re lucky if we go once every other year or so. It’s a shame.

    Reply
    1. Coop

      Patty… Same here. The Vegas bug use to bite me every 3-4 months. I now come home feeling exhausted and fleeced. Not relaxed and not feeling accomplished. My wife and I found the Caribbean is a much more relaxing experience and the prices are getting close to the same. They sure appreciate our business. No CNF charges down there. Its all in the price you pay up front.
      Michigan is a glorious place to live. But visiting warm weather can reset the soul. If the Vegas bug bites, I recommend downtown. They appreciate our business. Plus Scott is the new Mr. Las Vegas (sorry Mr Newton) and you may be lucky enough to run into him downtown and buy him a drink.

      Reply
  6. Larry Cash

    This is why I stopped going to their property years ago when they 1st started the resort the and I will not return

    Reply
  7. Eric Harris

    Alex you hit it on the head. We can blame “big data” and I don’t mean that as a joke. The same idea was applied to airlines 2 decades ago when the gambled on raising their prices and screwing over the public and it paid off. They gambled because they had enough data to tell them that customers would eat the difference and still fly. Who cares if they were pissed off?
    The results of this data just wasn’t available in the 80’s and the 90’s but it was being collected.

    Same thing applies to Vegas. The casinos have been doing the same thing. Collecting data on tourist habits,. Room rentals, gambling, etc. Even though there are plenty of places to gamble, Vegas is the premiere destination. And they now know once they’ve got you, they’ve got you. Short of a catastrophic failure, it will be a long time before you start to see casinos giving that money back (No resort fees, parking, CF’s) But I do know this. If one casino took the plunge and did it and it showed black on the balance sheet, the rest will fall in line.

    Reply
    1. David

      Why not give you a choice, pay the low room fee then get charged for resort fees. Or show a higher room rate and no resort fees also they should list what the resort fees are for and then you can decide which would be the best option

      Reply
      1. Renee Mayberry

        I agree
        Or have a pay by use option
        Ex.pool daily is x, gym daily is x per person
        Then you can decide
        The way it is now you are forced to pay for something in most of my cases we never use

        Reply
  8. Mary

    While I enjoy Las Vegas & we used to go 3-4 times per year, it’s no longer an inexpensive trip.

    We have only been twice in the past 4 years & the last time we stayed at the Luxor. It was so bad, we won’t ever stay at that hotel again.

    Reply
    1. Kat

      I was there a few weeks ago and stayed at Paris. Not only did we have the ridiculous resort and parking fees, they charged us $30 to check in!!! Our room was ready and it was almost 2 PM, so not like it was super early in the morning, but still had to pay to check in before 4 PM. Then I want 2 queen beds instead of King and they were going to almost double my room rate or move me to a handicap room that would be a $50 additional charge for the “view”. Asked about a rollaway bed and guess what…. Another charge of $30/night. Of course if that also means more than 2 people in the room there would be another charge! I swear I was worried they were going to add a few for each square of toilet paper we used.

      Reply
  9. Tammy Pennington

    We are down to 1 visit per year, from 4x per year. Used to get hand pays to keep us interested, too. Haven’t hit one in Vegas in years. Local casinos get our Vegas money now.

    Reply
  10. Coop

    Sounds like we are all in the same boat. Yet we flock to Vital Vegas to see if the Corporate Monsters are ready for us to return. Nope. Never. Sadly those days are gone.

    Reply
  11. David

    We live in Niagara Falls Canada and used to visit the Flamingo 2 or 3 times a year because they didn’t have resort fees. When they implemented resort fees we switched to the Golden Nugget downtown . Then they did the same.The Golden Nugget would throw in resort fees for a while then stopped. I have not visited for 3 years now and don’t plan on visiting until the casinos start treating us a bit better. Close to home there are quite a few options that are treating us very well and giving us entertainment value for our money. I do miss Las Vegas and can only hope they will see that they will be in trouble when the next recession hits. Then it maybe too little , too late. I’m not asking for anything for free, just be more honest and upfront with your pricing. I will gladly give you my money if you treat me fairly.

    Reply
  12. Turner

    I and my family will not go to Vegas again. The resort fees are a total rip off. What in the world do you get? Nothing that I can see. Parking fees? Idiocy! Vegas you are running people away with your asinine fees.

    Reply
  13. Boulder Steve

    When is the tipping point? Possibly when the resort fee exceeds the nightly room price..no that”s already happening in some places. It seems that Vegas is becoming less of a vacation destination and more of a corporate meeting convention town.

    Reply
    1. Boulder Steven

      And yet, so much more is done remotely and via the internet, it’s hard to believe that convention business is going to rise significantly any time soon. Although the visitor/convention bureau doesn’t seem concerned.

      Reply
      1. Ken

        Palazzo did not charge us resort fees the last two times there. No free WiFi was the only downgrade I noticed. Used my phone data plan to book reservations and shows. On top of that it’s free parking there and at it’s big sister. Rooms are cost more but far nicer and much bigger and when you subtract out parking and resort fees it’s almost a wash. I get offers from Treasure Island now and and they offer the same deal.

        Reply
  14. King Michael

    There have been many claims of doom via resort fees, parking fees, etc., and some of that is true. But I don’t see it.

    Once upon a time there were stories about how business was down at valet parking, and restaurants and shops were seeing a drop in traffic/revenue due to the parking fees. But for the most part, that’s not much of a concern.

    For a while, the taxi cab industry was hemorrhaging due to Lyft and Uber, but how many taxi cab companies have gone belly up? Yeah, a lot of cab drivers probably threw in the towel, the industry probably isn’t hiring so many these days, as their demand is low, but the cab companies are still on the road. Unhappy, but they’re not out of business.

    So for every gray hair that has been insulted by fees and rising costs in Vegas, s/he has been replaced by a younger, foolish kid with some cash from his great job in the greatest economy ever — so says Trump — and s/he doesn’t care that there are fees making the same experience more expensive than it use to be.

    Is it equal? Is there new blood for every gray hair that walks away? Not sure about that, but there’s enough money and enough addicts to keep the slots plugged in. Despite 6:5 blackjack and triple zero roulette, people haven’t stopped playing.

    Scott’s point about gambling elsewhere is irrelevant today, I’d argue. We’ve had gambling around the country, in some form, for at least 30 years. It’s more prolific today than it might have been 30 years ago, but it’s not the recent growth of nationwide gambling that is impacting Vegas. I’d say that ship set sail more than a decade ago.

    The resort fee game makes sense for the casinos. The small hike doesn’t bother me. Like others, it’s the sum of all parts that dictates whether the value of Vegas is worth it or not. Some have long said it is not, others are reaching that point. But others take their place, and as long as Vegas has the allure of being an adult playground, people will find their way. When they don’t, it means the allure is gone, or nobody can justify the cost. And we’re a long way away from the latter.

    Reply
    1. Doug Buchanan

      The grey hair are actually the onew that can afford to gamble. Vegas is getting more interested in bringing in the younger crowds through things to do in vegas other than gambling. These other things are still pitting people in rooms so the bonus yopuy on rooms and parking then that younger group tends to drink more so the raise these prices 12.00 for a .99 cent cost of a drink. They dont care if the younger bunch gambel. 25.00 black jack tabels for the grey that still like to gamble.

      Reply
  15. Jeremy Pielmeier

    Great add a couple more dollars to the theft they are already getting away with. I’m about done with this town at this point. I have gone to Vegas at least once a year for about 15 years now but I am seriously considering this to be my last year. I have a trip booked for third week in March and quite frankly if I didn’t have the flight booked already I would cancel it. Someone needs to tell these casinos their Vegas gambling monopoly is over and there are plenty of other places to go now.

    Reply
  16. DON

    Maybe my story isn’t relevant , but here it goes. I’ve been to Vegas over 30 times in my life dating back to 1971. Everyone has to realize that things change. I’m not going to defend the casinos for trying to make a profit every year. That’s business. Last summer in 2019 I went back to Vegas after a 10 year absence. I knew it would be very different. But I also knew it would be very exciting. One thing, the most important to me, were the gambling comps still available for serious gamblers. Well I’m happy to announce for all you readers looking for great value deals, they’re still available!! You all have to realize that Vegas, no matter what the changes are (good and bad) are all still based on gambling. Too many people going to Vegas just to site see, gorge themselves at buffets, and drag their children along just to irritate serious gambling vacationers. (even though casinos have accommodated you, Vegas is NO place for children). But getting back to my story, I took along $3,000 to cover my trip of 7 days. This money was going to be used for tipping and gambling ONLY. I realized that my first trip back in some time was going to be pricey. But my goal was to set myself up for the next trip. I will be returning in April of 2020, and here’s what I get for losing $2600.00 in 7 days. Comp Suite for 6 nites. $280.00 in free room charges. $25.00 per day food comp. $50.00 per day free play. Now I don’t know about you, but I was very pleased at the offer I got from my casino host. The moral of the story is , yes prices and services have gone way up but, if you take the time and effort to learn and enjoy what Vegas really is and for who it really is for, you’ll come out just fine. Retail value of my upcoming trip weighs in at over $4000.00. Who cares about free parking, hotel fees, and $70.00 buffets. (By the way, my resort fees, taxes, etc. were waved for my next trip) My stay will be virtually free except for gambling and tipping. WISCONSIN

    Reply
    1. James K

      Finally….somebody that gets it. Don is 100% correct. If you gamble, THEN you get the perks of no resort fee. I can’t believe all of the whining about resort fees in Vegas. Vegas was built on gambling, casinos want you to gamble, and are prepared to reward you if you do.
      So many people these days want to get something for nothing.

      Reply
  17. Richard Kido

    Not only will Vegas continue to charge resort fees, the phenomenon will only grow worldwide until it becomes an accepted norm. Here in my home state of Hawai’i, resort fees have proliferated in the past few years and for some properties, they are even higher than Vegas.

    In Europe, the practice had grown as well. It seems that Asia is still immune from resort fees but that’s gonna change.

    Here’s a good website that tracks resort fees worldwide:

    http://www.resortfeechecker.com/

    Reply
  18. Greg

    First, resort fees are OUR fault. Everyone that books on expedia and hotels.com, its their fault. Remember than next time.

    Now, as a business person, my suggestion to the casino. People booking direct with the casino get a discount or waived fee. If you booked with a 3rd party engine, your fees is not allowed to be waived, period.

    The goal is to get more business back to the casino.

    Reply
    1. Capt. Obvious

      I’d thank you for pointing out the obvious, but far too many people wouldn’t know a crack whore if she sat on their face.

      And you’re one of the few people to tout a simple, common sense solution. Morons love to trot out that tired line about how the Caesars empire claimed we “demanded” resort fees, but they’re morons, they don’t think about why the fees really exist.

      (For those that don’t know, here’s the explanation provided by the LV Advisor:

      • February 21, 2013 13:33 Caesars Ent. Speaks Out Re Fees: Here, verbatim, is the official statement from Caesars Entertainment corporate spokesman Gary Thompson, with regard to the rumored — now confirmed — introduction of resort fees at CET properties:

      “Resort fees at Caesars Entertainment Las Vegas resorts will begin March 1st and vary based on resort ranging from $10-25 and offer a mix of amenities and services, including Wi-fi, local calls, and fitness center access. The resort fees are in line with standard practices by many resorts in Las Vegas and worldwide.

      “Based on the current industry standards in the market and evaluation of the services our guests choose and use, a comprehensive package of bundled services and amenities proves to be the best and most meaningful value to our guests. This is in response to the increasing demand from our guests to provide a package price instead of the inconvenience of separate fees. We continue to do all we can to provide our guests with the best value, best products and best experiences in Las Vegas.”)

      Expedia, and the rest, are essentially the travel agencies of yesteryear. They’re the third party marketer of room blocks, which Vegas needs. If Expedia can put together an airfare and hotel package that appeals to me, I’ll use it. Expedia did me a solid in adding a cheap room to my airfare about 10 years ago. But I rarely go that route for a variety of reasons, as it is. But yeah, find more ways to encourage customers to book directly with the casino and it would seem like a huge win. It’s not that simple, but sometimes overthinking things doesn’t result in a better solution.

      Reply
  19. Harold Lee

    I was plan to go Vegas on Mar 2020. Then I saw resorts fee actually I don’t use. Pay more than hotel stay . Cancel my plant on Vegas and look somewhere else. Thanks Vegas ! Who knows when I’m going to visit Vegas . Suckers

    Reply
  20. Michael

    I use to work front desk at the Stardust befor it closed and our Mon-Thur room rate was $39/night + two free buffets each day + free coupon book. And no resort fees. Old Vegas is GONE!

    Reply
  21. Glenda L Roberts-Hagler

    If you live in Las Vegas Nevada you should NOT HAVE TO PAY RESORT FEES !!
    I I have lived here since 1960 and I would live anywhere else
    But I am on the verge of losing what I have because of rent
    going so high !!

    Reply
  22. Mike

    I stayed now at the American best value inn which is across from the mgm and there are no resort fees the Rooms are clean.

    Reply
  23. Barbara Provazek

    Use to travel to Vegas several times a year from Texas. Not anymore – resort fees the prime reason. I don’t and never have used spa- don’t use hotel room phone-(please? Who doesn’t have a cell phone these days?) Parking fees – no for me on that. Use to like to go to other casinos to gamble – not worth it now because of those parking fees. Don’t tip housekeeping because if those resort fees in place. The value is just not there anymore to visit Vegas. Shame on all the greedy people implementing these fees!

    Reply
  24. Harold

    Resorts fee as using coffee pot, wi fi, pool towel etc . Why fee cost more than hotel room. I don’t even use and I have unlimited data. Give me a break . Going out business like Atlantic City. Get it right Vegas !!

    Reply
  25. Ted Newkirk

    What is interesting is how many people have all-but-stopped visiting, but follow Las Vegas visitor news like a hawk.

    I’m not remotely happy about the fees, and I don’t profit from them. (In fact, we take flack because we’ll advertise hotel specials and get yelled at because people are going to get a resort fee). However, when you have people who are still hooked enough that they will come visit (even if it is fewer times per year), it is hard for a company to justify changing policy.

    If you only visit once per year, but your provide 1.5x or even 2x the room revenue you used to, they are unfortunately ahead of the game. AND… you may be staying longer on your one visit than you used to, which balances out their revenue even more.

    There are ways to make it up in finding savings elsewhere. Downtown comes to mind, more people seem to be getting slightly off-Strip, and values on The Strip can still be found if you know where to look. However, it is going to take a much larger movement of people seeking those values to ding the gouging.

    Reply
  26. humberto effio

    Resort fees are not making sence what you get noting ,you go for pool is cold , get w5 not working , you get bad service at phone systems .the parking valet 20 dlr at Caecars for 20 minutes then parking at flamingo waiting 10 minutes for getting you car from valet .if you saleman and go to sell to
    Hotel purchading you pay parking 20 dlr evety hotel ,so how can you get business then buyer is not available for 2 hrs.
    I live in vegas for 33 years and ready to move next the be charge for Free air , and view to the strip be extra . Many tourist driving from california pay 20 dlr parking each day even are guest at the hotel and call resorts beds with bugs at caesars that dont clean or desinfect the rooms before renting. They should spray the rooms for bugs beds and many customers get sick .st caesars palace .they dont pay your hospital bills .

    Reply
  27. Xyz

    Resort fees are broken out so the hotel doesn’t have to share any of that with booking sites. Otherwise, to the consumer, the rate plus resort fee is the real cost of the room. I read Booking.com is going after the resort fees too, so breaking them out has no real advantage. I’m sick of them too, having to figure them in to see the true cost of a stay.

    Reply
  28. Stan

    Stayed at the 4 Queens a few weeks ago for the first time because they don’t charge resort fees. You might have not got the resort fee but we spent a couple grand during our stay at the casino and had a great time. Thanks 4 Queens!

    Reply
  29. Funkhouser

    I keep my Diamond status purely for the free rooms and the resort fee being waived. When that goes away so will I. Caesars knows they can bleed these fees off group bookings and consolidators.

    Problem is their product is falling behind the competition, with hotels getting moved to the REITs expect less investment in room products which means further decline in quality, unless CaesarRado decides to re-invest in properties instead of bleed revenue out of every nook and crany.

    Reply
  30. Cindy Meridith

    I have visited Vegas for the last 25 years. I save my money every year to book a room, pay for my casino habit and buy food. I have never used anything at
    The hotels. I don’t drink, or use anything except my room, and I opt out of daily house keeping. I had booked a room for a week in Vegas, but I’m going to cancel. I already have to pay over 480.00 just to fly there. These fees take away from the casino. I guess they don’t really care because I never win anyway.
    I think that you should pay resort fees if you use the resort. Add it to your room key. When you check in, you can tell them if you want to use any of the resort fees. Most of the people who use them bring people with them that do not gamble.

    Reply
    1. Nosy Nelly

      Great question. Perhaps these folks are hoping to read that Vegas bean counters have realized the error of their ways and have corrected such errors? Is that a good enough reason, Allen?

      Reply
  31. Steven Pruitt

    Moved to Vegas in 1998. I fell in love with the atmosphere, the weather, and the fact it was such an adult playground. Now, i can not wait to get out. Its not the same place I fell in love with. Everything I enjoyed about Vegas has been taken away due to everything costing more and more each year. A good example would be the new Raider’s stadium. Legislators saddle residents, and visitors with debt we didn’t ask for, didn’t have the opportunity to vote for, and can not pay for without giving up something in our life style. So, I can pay for a portion of the new stadium, feel the excitement of having an NFL team in my city, but I can not afford a ticket. If can not afford to go, think about the visitors that come here to enjoy what the city has to offer. It will be a one shot stay, then never again. The bulk of people that have kept this place alive over many deccades, are now priced out, and same goes for the residents. Good luck in the future Vegas, but i will not be contributing anymore than i already have.

    Reply
  32. Maria

    At this point…. resort fees cost more then the room at certain times of the year. Why am I paying for pool usage on an outdoor pool in the middle of winter??? I don’t need internet. Who doesn’t have unlimited at this point in time? I’m on vacation in buffet capital of the west so no I do not want to use your gym! Smh. I’m over resort fees. It’s cheaper to leave the country.

    Reply
  33. Larry

    Only slightly off topic: You have to wonder if fears about the Coronavirus will hurt business in Vegas? I remember the last recession and how Vegas was supposedly hurting so bad.

    A lot of us kept going then, partly to support the place, and partly because it was a great deal. I wonder if that will continue now, especially if that virus takes hold in the US?

    I used to go to Vegas 3-4 times a year, for many, many years. It was FUN, it was easy to get away to for a few days on short notice, and it was a fair deal. You might end up in a different room, in a different hotel, and not really remember where you spent your money. But it was fun and it wasn’t annoying.

    People change, tastes change. I’ve found that there are other places that are just as fun. (And the weather is often better.) Variety is good. And even if they sometimes cost more, they’re still fun. And those other places don’t ANNOY me on a daily basis by nickle and diming me. I care less about the actual extra money, then I do about the perception that they’re f’ing me over.

    I’ll probably come back once in awhile, just to check out what’s new. But now it’ll be once every few years, instead of 3-4 times per year.

    Reply
  34. Richard Kido

    It’s all about Data Analytics. The Vegas hotel occupancy rates have remained relatively steady for the past 20 years at about 90% (except for a few years in the 80s when it dipped to the mid 80s. And that is with the increased inventory of rooms. Big Data indicates that resort fees do not keep the visitors away.

    Rather, it’s all about a shifting of the target customer market away from individual consumers like you and me to conventions, affinity groups, and to a large extent, foreign visitors. Those groups tend to look at the overall cost of a hotel room and with an average daily rate with resort fees included of less than $200, that’s a bargain compared to other big cities.

    I don’t like resort fees either and I go to Vegas 4 or 5 times a year so I stay at the Four Queens on Fremont which has no resort fees or the California Hotel which has a reasonable $20 resort fee. Somewhat ghetto but perfectly fine for my purposes.

    Reply
  35. James K

    I’ve read through the entire article, and all of the comments.
    Only 1, person shares my opinion.
    I go to Vegas to gamble, see shows, and the incredible food. with gambling being the #1 reason for going.
    The casinos want you to gamble, and for gambling at their place the are willing to give you something in return. As a diamond player I’ve never had to pay a resort fee. If I didn’t gamble, I wouldn’t expect the fees to be waived.
    Let’s face it folks you have one year to get 15000 tier credits, then you are good for the entire next year….that takes no time at all…IF YOU GAMBLE. Vegas’s bread and butter is still gambling, meet the requirements and reap the rewards.

    Reply

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