Confirmed: New York-New York’s Roller Coaster Will Go Virtual Reality

It was way back in August 2017 when we first, and solitarily, reported New York-New York’s roller coaster would be converting to a virtual reality ride.

Now, we’ve got proof it’s true.

New York-New York has tipped its hand by putting up signage that gives instructions for riders on the next iteration of the popular thrill ride.

Unfortunately, no photos are allowed on the roller coaster platform, so we aren’t able to share the photo below.

virtual reality roller coaster

Do you know this blog at all?

That’s right, the Big Apple’s virtual reality system is currently undergoing testing and the roller coaster is expected to go full VR in January 2018.

From what we hear, virtual reality will bump up the ride’s current price by $5, to 20 bucks.

Rider operators have shared there will no longer be a lower-priced, non-VR ticket option, although we trust guests won’t be forced to don the sex-magnet virtual reality goggles if they’d like to just gaze upon The Strip in the (yawn) traditional way.

Las Vegas roller coaster

Let us know how it goes. We are not a heights person. Not to mention our morbid fear of goggles.

The addition of virtual reality is a cunning way to increase Big Apple’s ticket price (known in retail parlance as the “per cap,” or the average amount spent by a customer).

The Big Apple roller coaster is hugely successful for New York-New York and its parent company, MGM Resorts, with 1.4 million riders each year.

There’s still been no official confirmation the New York-New York roller coaster will convert to virtual reality, but as we’ve said before, if it’s in a news release, it’s too late.

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  • 1.4 million riders a year? I find that hard to believe. That’s 3800 per day, or about 300 every hour. They’re dispatching a full train every 3 minutes?

    • Manybar Goatfish

      Maybe that’s why they’re going to virtual reality: to make it look like 1.4 million riders a year. That would be a good money laundering scheme if the IRS was wearing VR headsets, too.

    • Alex

      Maybe it’s $1.4 million in revenue? At $15/person, that’s 93,000 riders. That would be about 256 riders per day.

    • Skippy Apps

      How many of these rides were free? The coaster sales unlimited rides for $26… NewYork room keys work as BoGo’s…. MyVegas APP also gives away a BoGo’s, a $15 ride comp, and a $26 unlimited for free. So their is that also to think about.

      • Skippy Apps

        I went on it for the last time as non VR 2 days ago… I paid $26 for 3 unlimited passes using MyVegas. I never pay full price there.

  • FYMYAWF

    Another nice scoop by the best Vegas blog on the planet.

    Fearless prediction: I personally think a VR experience on top of what is already for many people a “stomach upsetting” roller coaster ride is going to turn this thing into a vomit comet.

    You won’t see my queasy self anywhere near that thing. Or under it.

    • VegasSlushy

      Best blog, 11th best podcast.

      I’m still stunned by how much people will pay for one ride on that roller coasters. And they’ll pay more for virtual reality? I just don’t get it.

      • slickpoetry

        I’m stunned to hear this thing was $15 per ride. That’s ludicrous.

  • Adding the virtual reality experience to that roller coaster ride should raise the “fun factor” considerably on what otherwise is very “sub-par”.

  • F and L V

    I was able to ride the NYNY VR Coaster last night as a part of the three day test run and it was pretty awesome! I was laughing out loud the whole time and screamed more than riding the coaster without the VR. My friend and I rode front seats but it honestly didn’t matter since the VR shows you that you are on the front seats regardless. I am a tad sick since my vision is pretty blurry but will do it again!