Monthly Archives: November 2019

New Sportsbook at The D Las Vegas Means Five Shows Are Done

Sports are a big deal, and a big draw, at The D. So, it’s not all that surprising to hear the downtown casino will turn its showroom into a proper sportsbook.

The closure of The D’s second floor showroom means its five resident shows will be out as of Jan. 5, 2020.

The D showroom

The curtain’s falling on The D’s showroom. Oh, like you didn’t see that coming.

The five shows closing at The D are: “Marriage Can Be Murder” (dinner show, never saw it), “Laughternoon” (entertaining, family-friendly show featuring Adam London), “Friends, The Musical Parody” (valiant effort, but forgettable), Jokesters Comedy Club (missed this one, too) and “Defending the Caveman” (the only show we’ve ever seen that was so bad, we walked out, then saw it another night with a different actor, just so we could walk out again).

“Marriage Can Be Murder” recently celebrated its 20th anniversary, with more than 6,000 performances under its belt. The dinner show originally opened at the Showboat Hotel & Casino.

The announcement of a new sportsbook at The D comes on the heels of a recent retooling of The D’s diminutive sportsbook not too far from the showroom. The unveil of that sportsbook happened in conjunction with a renovation of our home away from home, Vue Bar.

Vue Bar

Please don’t disturb us at Vue Bar. We already have carpal tunnel from all the autographs.

The showroom at The D never seemed an especially good fit for the casino. Downtown is much more about drinking and gambling than it is about theatrical productions.

Aside from the current crop, the only other show we can remember seeing in The D’s showroom was “Ja-Makin-Me-Laugh,” a show so awful it made “Defending the Caveman” look like “The Book of Mormon.”

Oh, and “Aussie Hunks” may have been there for a minute. Otherwise, we have no explanation for having taken this photo in 2015.

Aussie Hunks Las Vegas

Not to be mistaken for “Thunder From Down Under” or “Aussie Heat,” probably.

The new sportsbook at The D follows the recent launch of Circa Sports, a sports betting venture from brothers Derek and Greg Stevens.

The Stevens own The D, Golden Gate and the under-construction Circa Las Vegas resort. Circa is expected to open in Dec. 2020. (Note: We work in digital marketing at Fremont Street Experience as our day job. The D is a partner casino.)

We trust a couple of the shows displaced by the closure of The D’s showroom will find new homes. Hopefully, not all of them. Because life’s too short for entire shows centered around losing TV remotes and leaving the toilet seat up. All due respect to toilet seats.

Kaos Dayclub and Nightclub Closes at Palms

In the biggest Las Vegas implosion since the Riviera, Kaos dayclub and nightclub at Palms has closed.

Palms officials announced the closure following months of drama surrounding the venue that’s been bleeding cash since it opened in March 2019.

Here’s the official statement.

Kaos closed

“Taking time to reassess.” Otherwise known as “the last words you hear before somebody breaks your heart.”

Kaos was part of a $679 million renovation of Palms, an investment we personally consider to have been “a smidge on the batshit crazy side.”

The reasons for the failure of Kaos are many, but ultimately it was simply a matter of math.

The venue paid ungodly amounts of money for talent, and even on its busiest nights, Kaos failed to make a profit.

Marshmello, for example, snagged a deal for $60 million. Cardi B was paid $300,000 for each of her 15-minute performances. Simply unsustainable.

Kaos closed

Fun fact: We broke the news Kaos would be named Kaos. Which doesn’t seem all that much fun now for some reason.

Frank Fertitta, CEO of Red Rock Resorts, the company that owns Palms, said nightclub customers “did not have spendable money, we didn’t see the crossover into the casino.” Read more.

We are not an economist, but we’re fairly sure businesses prefer, and often require, the spendable kind of money.

Red Rock Resorts is writing off $28.2 million in losses from Kaos, with more on the way. Over the next six months, it’s expected they’ll have to write off another $16 million to $22 million.

The Kaos debacle has resulted in the ousting of a number of high profile executives. Recent departures include Jon Gray, G.M. of Palms, and Las Vegas nightlife heavy hitters Ryan M. Craig and Ronn Nicolli.

One twist to this story, generally not mentioned in coverage of the Kaos closure, was that time Tao Group bailed on a partnership to manage the nightlife at Palms in late 2018. It was a big red flag at the time, and entirely possible Tao Group saw the writing on the wall.

Had you been following us on Twitter, you would know all this because we’ve been chronicling the whole Kaos debacle in excruciating detail for months. We’ll wait while you follow.

Waiting.

Kaos Tweets

We like to think of Twitter as our quicker, snarkier “blog.”

What’s next for Kaos? As mentioned in the official statement above which you didn’t read completely because it was boring, the venue will be used for private meeting space and special events, “in addition to everyday resort pool operations.”

Most costly collective cringe, ever.

What does the Kaos saga mean for nightlife in Las Vegas? Nobody knows!

What other heads might roll at Palms? Nobody knows!

Is this the end of the bad news out of Palms? Nobody knows!

Are we just asking questions because we can’t think of a clever way to end this blog post? Absolutely!

We’ll close by saying we hope the folks working at Kaos find gainful employment elsewhere quickly, and we continue to root for Red Rock Resorts to win its gamble on Palms despite it being a longshot.