Here’s What MGM Grand Has In Store at Level Up Lounge

It was recently announced MGM Grand will join the growing list of Las Vegas casino desperately scrambling to woo millennials, younger guests who don’t seem to enjoy traditional forms of gambling all that much.

A new millennial-oriented lounge, Level Up Las Vegas, will soon open at MGM Grand in the space formerly occupied by the Rainforest Cafe (which moved to Harmon Corner).

Rainforest Cafe MGM Grand

Rainforest Cafe closed at MGM Grand in August 2015. Millennial translation: A bajillion years ago.

Level Up will be managed by Hakkasan Group, the nightclub people responsible for hugely successful clubs like Hakkasan at MGM Grand, Omnia at Caesars Palace and others.

Hakkasan

Seven of the 10 best-earning nightclubs in the world are in Las Vegas, and Hakkasan consistently dominates the revenue rankings.

A third party recruiter for MGM Grand has tipped its hand about what’s in store for Level Up, sending out a job posting that provides what’s sure to be a polarizing peek into both Level Up and potentially the future of casinos.

“We need very little experience dealing but you must be an entertainer,” says the call for job applications. “We are looking for people that are outgoing, bubbly and can really entertain.”

Hold onto your participation trophy, because this video is the inspiration for Level Up.

If you think this hybrid of nightclub, stadium-style gambling and trying-much-too-hard are a special kind of Hell on Earth, guess what—you’re not who it’s for!

Casinos are convinced millennials will enjoy gambling more if they can figure out how to take as much of the gambling out of it as possible. It’s more about the interactivity, the music, the party.

Level Up appears to be what middle-aged white guys in suits think millennials want, based upon reading white papers and attending panel discussions at gaming expos.  Which is definitely a recipe for success.

As for the dealer jobs, the posting continues, “The pay is a guaranteed $25/hour. You will not share in the tokes of the MGM dealers. You will receive the tokes given to you in this pit though.”

“Tokes,” by the way, are tips.

So, the dealers aren’t traditional dealers. It’s not about the dealing, you see. They’re more “dealertainers,” a term once reserved for the performing dealers at Imperial Palace, a position quickly killed off when the Imperial Palace became The Linq.

Dealertainer

Brownie points if you even know what we’re pining for.

The Level Up job posting concludes, “If you consider yourself to be an emcee type of personality then this will be a great job for you.”

If we ever create a list of people we least want to spend time with, those who consider themselves “emcee types” are likely to sit comfortably at the top.

Millennial casino

The future of Las Vegas casinos. Over our dead body.

Then again, we are not a millennial, and casinos have to try something to wrangle these confounding millennials. Downtown Grand went with eSports. Encore tried its Encore Player’s Club. And just about everyone in town has tried cornhole.

It remains to be seen if younger casino customers will respond to Level Up’s special kind of WTF. Apparently, it’s easier for casinos to provide noise, feigned enthusiasm and skill-based games than outmoded things like value and customer service and actual fun.

Since we’re admittedly not the target audience for Level Up, we’ll share a couple of thoughts from our always-insightful commenters.

Guillaume says, “I live in Montreal and I love The Zone at the casino, super excited to see it’s in store for Las Vegas. The Zone is always full on weekends, the party is fun and the minimums are way lower than at tables (3:2 black jack with good enough rules for 5$, can’t beat that). I really believe it’s going to be successful in Vegas too and can’t wait to see it!”

Commenter Mike adds, “It does look kind of fun to me, I’d definitely try it out. I know as a resident I’m spoiled because the usual Vegas is ho-hum regular, but the part of me that loved the SpaceQuest casino at the ex-Hilton would give this a whirl. If you don’t like it, there’s literally the largest casino floor in the United States right outside the door. And it’s got those same amber lights, those same red carpets, and that same damn Bruno Mars song playing that you can find everywhere else.”

We’d love to hear what you think. Of course, you’ll get a ribbon for leaving a comment.

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  • Alas for MGM, those pesky millennials have finely tuned BS detectors. And this is one highly polished turd with black lights and a laser show.

    • FYMYAWF

      This.

      And if any of you see me getting drunk enough to set foot in this hellspawn of a place, you have carte blanche to tackle me.

    • Exactly! Authentic isn’t just a buzzword.

  • NHBill603

    You know what’s fun about casinos? Winning. It’s great when I win of course. But it’s fun when somebody, anybody else wins once in a while. The problem with today’s gaming is not enough winners. Casino floors are like funeral parlors half the time. Loosen up just enough to amp up the fun.

  • Kathy C.

    I’m of the “old Vegas” genre, where you could play all weekend on $100. See a lounge show for a 2 drink minimum. The theme hotels have been fun. But seriously I’m not this social. A full black jack table is about all I can handle. I would much prefer an empty bank of slot machines, lol.

    Oh, and where’s my ribbon?

  • Guillaume

    I live in Montreal and I love The Zone at the casino, super excited to see it’s in store for Las Vegas. The Zone is always full on week-ends, the party is fun and the minimums are way lower than at tables (3:2 black jack with good enough rules for 5$, can’t beat that). I really believe it’s going to be succesful in Vegas too and can’t wait to see it!

    • Thank you for your thoughts. I’m going to add them to the story.

    • AccessVegas

      That is IF they have $5, 3-2 blackjack.

  • mike__ch

    It does look kind of fun to me, I’d definitely try it out. I know as a resident I’m spoiled because the usual Vegas is ho-hum regular, but the part of me that loved the SpaceQuest casino at the ex-Hilton would give this a whirl.

    If you don’t like it, there’s literally the largest casino floor in the United States right outside the door. And it’s got those same amber lights, those same red carpets, and that same damn Bruno Mars song playing that you can find everywhere else.

    • Thanks for your thoughts. I think I’ll add your comment to the story.

  • OK Vegas

    I’m the target market, and to channel my inner-millennial: I “can’t even” with this. I’ve taken about twenty trips to Vegas–sometimes I gamble, sometimes I don’t. I’m going with about a dozen friends this weekend, and I except maybe half will even notice the casino. I’ll speak only for me, but I think recent attempts (Encore’s lounge, ect.) are just too “inauthentic,” as someone else stated. I don’t want to play in a lounge, because it’s too much like a club…and well, I’ll buy a table at a club if that’s what I want.

    What I want: a return of lower table minimums (or more of a demand based system in that respect). I don’t want someone else telling me how much to put on the table. It’s my risk, my decision. I see the electronic table games gaining more traction with my friends, because they can better customize their bets. I think others overplay the “experience” part of the Millennial demographic. Experience is part, but it has a counterweight in value. I stay at Aria, Wynn, or Cosmopolitan, but I gamble at the Linq or (increasingly) downtown. I find the rooms and service at those hotels to be worth it, but often see their tables empty (except at peak hours). I’ll frequently meet the table minimums at the hotels I stay out, but gamble at places where I can scale down if that’s my feeling of the table at the time.

    I don’t believe Vegas can “build” it’s way into Millennial’s hearts. I’ve have not one friend who has ever said, “man, I’d gamble but this place just doesn’t seem to cater to my generation’s sensibilities.”

    The other thing I would change: Have more “low-risk” teaching moments. It’s amazing how many of my friends don’t know the basic rules of many table games, so they stay away because of the perceived learning curve. Again, I think it’s the value weighing in here again. It does no good to have free Craps lessons on Sunday’s at 10am, if (i) your flight leaves Sunday afternoon; and (ii) you were out until 3am the night before.

  • SD Sun Devil

    Looks like it could be successful for a while, but doubt it lasts. It also looks expensive to turn over when it finally does die out. Vegas apparently doesn’t know what it wants to be any more. They clearly don’t care about the low rollers (i.e. locals + Millennials + a good chunk of regular visitors) as they don’t add enough to the bottom line. So they keep adding more and more expensive ‘experiences’ trying to get people to spend $100’s for what is essentially nothing. They just keep squeezing people and that can’t last given all of the hotel rooms, casinos and restaurants they have to keep full. Eventually, people are going to give up on Vegas and find other places to go since it isn’t a bargain any more.